Elizabeth LoCascio, D.O., Aspen Medical Group, Inc.

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Elizabeth LoCascio, D.O., is an Obstetrician and Gynecologist that works in a Multi-Specialty Group in the Riverside and Corona areas.  She enjoys all aspects of her specialty.  Her group has both Pediatricians and OB/GYN practitioners, making it easy for her patients to have continuity of care after delivery.  Her areas of interest are high risk obstetrical care as well as gynecology procedures. She is very passionate when it comes to helping her patients.

CLINICAL PRACTICE:
General Obstetrics and High Risk Obstetrics
Office Procedures including Essure Placement & Endometrial Ablation
Contraceptive Management  |  Heavy Menstrual Bleeding  |  Well Women Exams
EDUCATION:
2008 Doctor of Osteopathy  |  Western University of Health Sciences  |  Pomona, CA
RESIDENCY:
2008-2010 Resident Physician, Obstetrics & Gynecology
Arrowhead Regional Medical Center  |  Colton, CA  |  Riverside County Regional Medical Center   |  Moreno Valley, CA.
US ARMY SERVICE:
1996-1999 Specialist  |  Combat Medic  |  Clinical Lab Specialist  |  Aeromedical Evacuation Training & Isolation Team Leader

Elizabeth LoCascio, D.O., is an Obstetrician and Gynecologist that works in a Multi-Specialty Group in the Riverside and Corona areas. She enjoys all aspects of her specialty. Her group has both Pediatricians and OB/GYN practitioners, making it easy for her patients to have continuity of care after delivery. Her areas of interest are high risk obstetrical care as well as gynecology procedures. She is very passionate when it comes to helping her patients.

Featured Editorial: New Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines
By Elizabeth LoCascio, D.O.

Every day I see patients for their annual gynecologic exam and many of my new patients are still under the impression that they need a pap smear every year.  When I inform them that they actually only need a pap smear every 3-5 years I get a mixed response.

Many women let out a sigh of relief, but many more are concerned. So I want to explain the new recommendations and hopefully alleviate some concern.   The new guidelines recommend that all women begin cervical cancer screening at age 21.  Women aged 21-29 years should be tested using the pap smear alone every 3 years.  Women aged 30-65 should get both a pap smear and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing every 5 years.  Screening should be discontinued after age 65 in women with adequate screening and no significant abnormal findings.
In order to understand why we need screening less frequently, it is important to understand what we are screening.  Cervical cancer is the 3rd most common gynecologic cancer diagnosed.   The incidence of cervical cancer in the United States has decreased more than 50% in the past 30 years because of widespread screening.
When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life. High risk HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer and can be detected in 99.7% of cervical cancers.
But not all women with HPV will develop cervical cancer.  HPV is most common in teenagers and women in their early 20s, but most young women clear the infection before it can do any harm.  It is only when HPV persists over many years that women are at risk for cancer.  When pap smears are performed more frequently, many abnormal pap smears are treated unnecessarily.  This can cause significant stress in women as well as complications in the future.
It is important to note that some risk factors qualify patients for more frequent screening starting at a younger age.  It is important to see your gynecologist annually for a well-woman exam to discuss your personal history to determine what is right for you.